fastcompany
fastcompany:

Plan any event and chances are one in five of the people you invite will be late.
A study done at San Francisco State University found that about 20% of the U.S. population is chronically late—but it’s not because they don’t value others’ time. It’s more complicated than that, says lead researcher Diana DeLonzor.
“Repetitive lateness is more often related to personality characteristics such as anxiety or a penchant for thrill-seeking,” she says. “Some people are drawn to the adrenaline rush of that last-minute sprint to the finish line, while others receive an ego boost from over-scheduling and filling each moment with activity.”
In her book Never Be Late Again: 7 Cures for the Punctually Challenged, DeLonzor says our relationship with time often starts in childhood and becomes an ingrained habit.
“Looking back, you were probably late or early all of your life—it’s part physiological and part psychological,” she says. “Most chronically late people truly dislike being late, but it’s a surprisingly difficult habit to overcome. Telling a late person to be on time is a little like telling a dieter to simply stop eating so much.”
DeLonzor says the majority of people have a combination of late and punctual habits—usually on time, but with a frantic rush at the last minute—but we can all learn from those who are chronically punctual. DeLonzor shares four traits that always on time share:
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i work hard at being punctual and sometimes i fail, but i like this. 

fastcompany:

Plan any event and chances are one in five of the people you invite will be late.

A study done at San Francisco State University found that about 20% of the U.S. population is chronically late—but it’s not because they don’t value others’ time. It’s more complicated than that, says lead researcher Diana DeLonzor.

“Repetitive lateness is more often related to personality characteristics such as anxiety or a penchant for thrill-seeking,” she says. “Some people are drawn to the adrenaline rush of that last-minute sprint to the finish line, while others receive an ego boost from over-scheduling and filling each moment with activity.”

In her book Never Be Late Again: 7 Cures for the Punctually Challenged, DeLonzor says our relationship with time often starts in childhood and becomes an ingrained habit.

“Looking back, you were probably late or early all of your life—it’s part physiological and part psychological,” she says. “Most chronically late people truly dislike being late, but it’s a surprisingly difficult habit to overcome. Telling a late person to be on time is a little like telling a dieter to simply stop eating so much.”

DeLonzor says the majority of people have a combination of late and punctual habits—usually on time, but with a frantic rush at the last minute—but we can all learn from those who are chronically punctual. DeLonzor shares four traits that always on time share:

Read More>

i work hard at being punctual and sometimes i fail, but i like this. 

nypl
nypl:

Homer, Shakespeare, Fitzgerald and Baldwin – the “classics”. These are the authors we remember from our high school required reading. But what about today’s high schoolers? We took a look at their reading lists from the NYC DOE. Featuring graphic novels, YA titles, and plenty of stories of adventure, we have to admit we’re a little jealous of that list. Which books do you remember from your high school reading list? 

nypl:

Homer, Shakespeare, Fitzgerald and Baldwin – the “classics”. These are the authors we remember from our high school required reading. But what about today’s high schoolers? We took a look at their reading lists from the NYC DOE. Featuring graphic novels, YA titles, and plenty of stories of adventure, we have to admit we’re a little jealous of that list. Which books do you remember from your high school reading list? 

explore-blog

There’s nothing more complex than human beings. And while we come alive in our idiosyncrasies, they sometimes tear us apart when they should humble us and hold a mirror up to our own shortcomings and gifts.

To this real love, I owe you an apology. I’ve dismissed you, belittled you and written you off because you didn’t appear at my doorstep in the beautifully wrapped package I was conditioned to seek. I should have seen the best of me in you, but I didn’t recognize your face. But I see you now.

Thank you for holding out, knowing I’d find my way back…

Beautiful love letter to real love. As Susan Sontag memorably put it, “Nothing is mysterious, no human relation. Except love. 

For more on how our cultural conditioning makes us dismiss this kind of love, see Dan Savage on the price of admission.

(via explore-blog)