check that privilege.

I had to spell-check the word privilege just now. let’s just move that to the top of the privilege-checking things.

ok, now that I’ve got that out there, I can at least move on, thinking about and acknowledging the rest. that’s the first part, action comes next. that’s the hard part.

I can’t stop thinking about privilege and most recently, it comes in the form of my race. my white privilege. that’s taken the forefront because of, recently anyway, Ferguson.

I recognize that I grew up in a white area - white community and undeniably, Wisconsin is a really white place. I don’t always know how to talk about race, but up to now, I offer a listening ear. I offer up the understanding of an outsider.

I recognize that my current outsider status, or, my outsider understanding comes from a combination of three parts:

1. in my Madison community, I come from a lower-class background.
2. in my everyday life, I am an outsider because i am a gay woman.
3. in my daily life as a white woman, neither of the precious two things come into question until I make them known.

I don’t always openly advertise those things as I don’t usually tell people right away that my parents were 19 and 21, respectively, when I was born. I don’t say straight off that I was the first in my immediate family to attend and graduate from four-year college. I do not offer up that I was a four-year, letter-winning, division 1 college athlete. there are a lot of privileges i have, things that aren’t outwardly apparent, that your could use to pass judgement on me.

but the mine thing I keep coming back to, the thing that’s always on my mind is that I am a seemingly “normal” white woman who can live everyday with all of those things that set me apart from so many of my peers without being found out.

if only there were something to tell me apart.

the color of my skin!?

I’m not even sure. but I know one thing is for certain - that I’m constantly aware and checking that one piece if privilege of mine at each and every single door I walk through.

what are you doing?

and what can I be doing?

to actually move things forward. to take action. to make things better.

explore-blog

We begin to find and become ourselves when we notice how we are already found, already truly, entirely, wildly, messily, marvelously who we were born to be. The only problem is that there is also so much other stuff, typically fixations with how people perceive us, how to get more of the things that we think will make us happy, and with keeping our weight down. So the real issue is how do we gently stop being who we aren’t? How do we relieve ourselves of the false fronts of people-pleasing and affectation, the obsessive need for power and security, the backpack of old pain, and the psychic Spanx that keeps us smaller and contained?

Here’s how I became myself: mess, failure, mistakes, disappointments, and extensive reading; limbo, indecision, setbacks, addiction, public embarrassment, and endless conversations with my best women friends; the loss of people without whom I could not live, the loss of pets that left me reeling, dizzying betrayals but much greater loyalty, and overall, choosing as my motto William Blake’s line that we are here to learn to endure the beams of love.

fastcompany
fastcompany:

A designer’s guide to improving end-of-life care.
The world’s population is aging. The World Health Organization estimates that by 2050, the proportion of people 60 years or older in the world will have doubled, from 11% in 2000 to 22% (2 billion people) in 2050. This makes services for the elderly, like hospice care, which seeks to ease the pain (physical and emotional) of terminally ill patients and their families in their last days, even more important.
The problem is, we tend to avoid talking about death and dying, and people don’t always make plans in advance for end-of-life care. And as it stands, today’s hospice care system can be can be impersonal, under-resourced and under-staffed, and plagued with communication issues between care workers, patients, and families. In some cases, the people who provide palliative care are also paid criminally low wages. In the U.S., home hospice care work only recently stopped being classified as “companionship,” meaning workers didn’t qualify for federal labor protections.

Singapore- and Barcelona-based health care design consultancy fuelfor spent nine months researching hospice care and its issues in Singapore, where the designers found hospice to be an “invisible and avoided service.” Commissioned by the Lien Foundation, a Singapore-based philanthropy, and the ACM Foundation, a funeral service company, fuelfor came up with a handful of strategies to improve the way hospice care is run, both in Singapore and in the rest of the world.
The Hospitable Hospice handbook (which won a 2014 International Design Excellence Award) redesigns not only the look and function of hospice care facilities, but also how hospice workers communicate with each other, how people learn about and experience the hospice process, and how people pay for care. Here are seven of their suggestions for better care:
Read More>

fastcompany:

A designer’s guide to improving end-of-life care.

The world’s population is aging. The World Health Organization estimates that by 2050, the proportion of people 60 years or older in the world will have doubled, from 11% in 2000 to 22% (2 billion people) in 2050. This makes services for the elderly, like hospice care, which seeks to ease the pain (physical and emotional) of terminally ill patients and their families in their last days, even more important.

The problem is, we tend to avoid talking about death and dying, and people don’t always make plans in advance for end-of-life care. And as it stands, today’s hospice care system can be can be impersonal, under-resourced and under-staffed, and plagued with communication issues between care workers, patients, and families. In some cases, the people who provide palliative care are also paid criminally low wages. In the U.S., home hospice care work only recently stopped being classified as “companionship,” meaning workers didn’t qualify for federal labor protections.

image

Singapore- and Barcelona-based health care design consultancy fuelfor spent nine months researching hospice care and its issues in Singapore, where the designers found hospice to be an “invisible and avoided service.” Commissioned by the Lien Foundation, a Singapore-based philanthropy, and the ACM Foundation, a funeral service company, fuelfor came up with a handful of strategies to improve the way hospice care is run, both in Singapore and in the rest of the world.

The Hospitable Hospice handbook (which won a 2014 International Design Excellence Award) redesigns not only the look and function of hospice care facilities, but also how hospice workers communicate with each other, how people learn about and experience the hospice process, and how people pay for care. Here are seven of their suggestions for better care:

Read More>