west wing, folks.

theatlantic
theatlantic:

The Grammys’ Big Gay Wedding for Straight Superstars

Congrats to the 33 couples, gay and straight, who walked into the Grammy Awards Sunday night unmarried and walked out as newlyweds. Queen Latifah officiated your wedding; Madonna sang at it; Beyoncé was in the front row—no matter what, that’s an amazing way to kick off a life together.
But the mass marriage that took place to Macklemore’s “Same Love” and Madonna’s “Open Your Heart” towards the end of the night Sunday wasn’t really for the people getting hitched. They were props. It wasn’t really for gay rights either. Any public good that potentially came from the moment—maybe someone at home changing their attitudes about same-sex marriage—were side effects. The main reason for the nuptials, it seemed, was to give the musicians on stage and recording-academy members a chance to announce themselves as good people.
Which, of course, is always the point of everything that happens at Grammys. Like any major awards show, it’s an ad for its industry. This year, the message being sold was, as host LL Cool J dutifully put it at the beginning, that music’s awesomeness transcends all boundaries. Funnily enough, until the ultra-hyped “Same Love” stunt, the ceremony had been doing a pretty good, subtle (if too-slow) job of driving home that message.
Read more. [Image: Reuters]

theatlantic:

The Grammys’ Big Gay Wedding for Straight Superstars

Congrats to the 33 couples, gay and straight, who walked into the Grammy Awards Sunday night unmarried and walked out as newlyweds. Queen Latifah officiated your wedding; Madonna sang at it; Beyoncé was in the front row—no matter what, that’s an amazing way to kick off a life together.

But the mass marriage that took place to Macklemore’s “Same Love” and Madonna’s “Open Your Heart” towards the end of the night Sunday wasn’t really for the people getting hitched. They were props. It wasn’t really for gay rights either. Any public good that potentially came from the moment—maybe someone at home changing their attitudes about same-sex marriage—were side effects. The main reason for the nuptials, it seemed, was to give the musicians on stage and recording-academy members a chance to announce themselves as good people.

Which, of course, is always the point of everything that happens at Grammys. Like any major awards show, it’s an ad for its industry. This year, the message being sold was, as host LL Cool J dutifully put it at the beginning, that music’s awesomeness transcends all boundaries. Funnily enough, until the ultra-hyped “Same Love” stunt, the ceremony had been doing a pretty good, subtle (if too-slow) job of driving home that message.

Read more. [Image: Reuters]

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Surviving trauma takes “firefighters” and “builders.” Very few people are both.

[…]

In times of crisis, we want our family, partner, or dearest friends to be everything for us. But surviving trauma requires at least two types of people: the crisis team — those friends who can drop everything and jump into the fray by your side, and the reconstruction crew — those whose calm, steady care will help nudge you out the door into regaining your footing in the world. In my experience, it is extremely rare for any individual to be both a firefighter and a builder. This is one reason why trauma is a lonely experience. Even if you share suffering with others, no one else will be able to fully walk the road with you the whole way.

Catherine Woodiwiss shares 10 things she learned about trauma – not your usual listicle, but a thoughtful, remarkable, existentially necessary read.

(via The Dish)